Why Every Lorry Driver Needs A Sat Nav

 

Recently, GPSs have become invaluable tools for haulage companies. They take your HGV’s specifications into consideration and provide real-time traffic details to help make delivery workan easier and more cost-effective process.

 

What is a Satellite Navigation System?

 

Using three satellites, Sat Navs detect your geographical position and calculate the best routes to get you from your current location to your desired destination. They provide, as you well know, step-by-step directions in real time.

 

While it can be tempting to use smartphones as GPSs, hauliers shouldn’t rely on Google or Apple Maps when carrying out delivery work. Professional truck Sat Navs are far more reliable, thanks to the following perks.

 

A Map Tailored to the Truck’s Specifications

 

With truck-specific Sat Navs, you can enter your vehicle’s maximum speed, its type and its materials, as well as its weight, width, length and height. The route will then be planned according to these considerations, avoiding roads or bridges that aren’t suitable for your vehicle.

 

A Large Screen

 

Most smartphone screens aren’t large enough to provide a full picture of the road. As zooming in while carrying out delivery workis incredibly dangerous, the safest thing to do is to acquire a GPS with a large screen. That way, your drivers will be able to see where they are going.

 

Detailed Points of Interest

 

With these professional GPSs, hauliers can see where the truckstops and gas stations are on the map, allowing them to pick one that suits their needs.

 

No Additional Costs

 

Unlike smartphones that require an internet connection, professional Sat Navs use offline satellite technology, meaning that there’s need to pay for extra 4G data.

 

Save Time and Fuel

 

With real-time traffic updates, hauliers receive alerts about accidents, blockades and traffic jams on your route. They’ll then be diverted accordingly, enabling them to avoid delays. The map will also choose the most direct route, avoiding unnecessary detours and the waste of petrol.

 

Speed Camera Warnings

 

Sat Navs also alert drivers to police speed guns and speed cameras, reminding drivers not to go over the limit and risk getting a speeding ticket.

 

Collect Data

 

Sat Navs also track the braking and revving habits of your hauliers. If their driving is not fuel-efficient, you can then give them training or tips on how to operate more effectively.

 

Top Sat Navs

 

TomTom PRO 7250 Truck: The TomTom PRO 7250 is a simpler version of the TomTom PRO 5250 Truck. During delivery work, it gives hauliers access to real-time traffic details and continuously updates itself with the latest road developments across Europe.

 

TomTom PRO 5250 Truck: This GPS provides driver privacy, as hauliers can switch the tracker off at the end of their shift. You can also have one device for each driver, as it is portable and can be moved from one vehicle to another.

 

Haulage companies always look to maximise profits by making delivery workmore effective. Make sure that your drivers have the best Truck Sat Navs to help them find the most direct and fuel-efficient routes.

Author Plate

Norman Dulwich is a Correspondent for Haulage Exchange, the leading online trade network for the road transport industry. Connecting logistics professionals across the UK and Europe through their website, Haulage Exchange provides services for matching delivery work with available drivers. Over 5,000 transport exchange businesses are networked together through their website, trading jobs and capacity in a safe 'wholesale' environment.

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